3dAudioBooks | An Essay Concerning Human Understanding Book IV | Part – 2 | John LOCKE | Education, Writing & Linguistics, Modern

Author: John LOCKE (1632 – 1704)

Description: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding is a work by John Locke concerning the foundation of human knowledge and understanding. It first appeared in 1689 (although dated 1690) with the printed title An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding. He describes the mind at birth as a blank slate (tabula rasa, although he did not use those actual words) filled later through experience. The essay was one of the principal sources of empiricism in modern philosophy, and influenced many enlightenment philosophers, such as David Hume and George Berkeley.

This book focuses on knowledge in general – that it can be thought of as the sum of ideas and perceptions. Locke discusses the limit of human knowledge, and whether knowledge can be said to be accurate or truthful.

Thus there is a distinction between what an individual might claim to “know”, as part of a system of knowledge, and whether or not that claimed knowledge is actual. Locke writes at the beginning of the fourth chapter, Of the Reality of Knowledge): “I doubt not my Reader by this Time may be apt to think that I have been all this while only building a Castle in the Air; and be ready to say to me, To what purpose all of this stir? Knowledge, say you, is only the Perception of the Agreement or Disagreement of our own Ideas: but who knows what those Ideas may be? … But of what use is all this fine Knowledge of Man’s own Imaginations, to a Man that enquires after the reality of things? It matters now that Mens Fancies are, ’tis the Knowledge of Things that is only to be priz’d; ’tis this alone gives a Value to our Reasonings, and Preference to one Man’s Knowledge over another’s, that is of Things as they really are, and of Dreams and Fancies.”

In the last chapter of the book, Locke introduces the major classification of sciences into physics, semiotics, and ethics.

Genre(s): Education, Writing & Linguistics, Modern

Language: English

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